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HIGHLIGHT: New Fracking Expose Released

Watch our new expose on fracking to learn the truth about this dangerous drilling.

 

HIGHLIGHT: In the Path of the Storm

Four out of five Americans live in areas hit by recent weather-related disasters. Check out our interactive online map showing, county-by-county, which weather-related disasters hit when. Then tell the Obama administration you want strong carbon pollution limits on power plants. 

More Research, Policy, Education & Action

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Region's rivers are some of nation's most polluted

Forty years ago this week the federal Clean Water Act was passed, setting a goal to make all of America's rivers, streams, lakes and estuaries "fishable and swimmable" by 1983.

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Headline

Editorial: Toxic status quo: There's a long way to go in cleaning up waterways

Pittsburgh's rivers have become such popular spots for recreation that it's been easy to assume that toxin-laden waters were a relic of the region's past.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Wasting our Waterways 2012

Industrial facilities continue to dump millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s rivers, streams, lakes and ocean waters each year—threatening both the environment and human health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pollution from industrial facilities is responsible for threat- ening or fouling water quality in more than 14,000 miles of rivers and streams, more than 220,000 acres of lakes, ponds and estuaries nationwide. 

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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

10 Million Pounds of Toxic Chemicals Dumped into Pennsylvania’s Waterways

Industrial facilities dumped more than 10 million pounds of toxic chemicals into Pennsylvania’s waterways, making Pennsylvania’s waterways the seventh worst in the nation, according to a new report released today by PennEnvironment.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center

Building a Better America

We can save money and help solve global warming by reducing the amount of energy we use, including in the buildings where we live and work every day. More than 40 percent of our energy — and 10 percent of all the energy used in the world — goes toward powering America’s buildings. But today’s high-efficiency homes and buildings prove that we have the technology and skills to drastically improve the efficiency of our buildings while simultaneously improving their comfort and affordability.

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