Repower Pennsylvania

Coal, gas and nuclear — we can do better

The ways that we produce and use energy in Pennsylvania have a severe impact on our environment and health. PennEnvironment is working toward a new energy future that promotes clean, renewable energy and uses efficient technologies to help protect the planet.

Pennsylvania could be doing a lot better when it comes to the ways we use and produce our energy. Dirty, coal-fired power plants pollute our air with smog and soot, and our rivers and streams with mercury. Marcellus Shale gas drilling contaminates our streams and destroys our pristine forests. Nuclear power plants produce toxic waste, and pose the unlikely but catastrophic threat of a Fukushima-style disaster.

Powerful polluters push for the dirty energy status quo

Unfortunately, many electricity companies, coal companies and other polluters want to continue our reliance on dirty energy sources. These powerful interests are putting short-term profits ahead of our environment and health — and they have unfettered access and influence in the halls of the state capitol in Harrisburg and in Washington, D.C. Electric utilities spent more than $105 million on lobbying in 2011 alone.  Now they're pushing to cut Pennsylvania's critical Advanced Energy Portfolio Standard, which supports clean energy sollutions like wind and solar.  

Solar and wind offer path to a new energy future

At PennEnvironment, we have a different vision. We can get our energy from clean, renewable homegrown sources like wind and solar, while creating thousands of much-needed jobs in the state. We can achieve a new energy future where our homes and buildings create more clean energy than they need, where public transportation systems thrive and reduce our reliance on oil, and where technology allows our cars to get more than 100 miles to the gallon.

Pennsylvania has the technological know-how and renewable energy potential to clean up and modernize the way we produce energy. Clean, renewable energy sources are in abundance in Pennsylvania — especially wind and solar power — and they can help the Commonwealth decrease its reliance on dirtier, polluting forms of energy.


Clean Energy Updates

News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

EPA proposes first-ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever, federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global warming pollution in America. PennEnvironment enthusiastically applauded the proposed limits, which once finalized will be the largest step the U.S. has taken to combat global warming.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Wind Energy for a Cleaner America II

Burning fossil fuels to generate electricity pollutes our air, contributes to global warming, and consumes vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. In contrast, wind energy produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

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Headline

Group Calls for Curbs on Carbon Emissions

An environmental organization on Tuesday decried Pennsylvania's status as a leading producer of global warming pollution and called on U.S. Sens. Bob Casey and Pat Toomey to support limits on carbon emissions from power plants.

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Headline

Brunner Island listed among the nation's most carbon polluting plants

In 2011, PPL's Brunner Island coal-fired power plant discharged roughly the same amount of carbon emissions as 1.79 million cars. On Monday, the PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center released a report which ranks the East Manchester Township plant as No. 59 on a list of the nation's 100 most polluting power plants.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center

America's Dirtiest Power Plants

This report from PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center finds that Pennsylvania ranks 3rd in the country for most carbom pollution from its power plants, the nation's largest single source of global warming pollution.  It illustrates the scale of carbon pollution from Pennsylvania's power sector and ranks Pennsylvania's biggest carbon polluters.  

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