Reports

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Shining Cities

The use of solar power is expanding rapidly across the United States. By the end of 2014, the United States had 20,500 megawatts (MW) of cumulative solar electric capacity, enough to power four million average U.S. homes. This success is the outcome of federal, state and local programs that are working in concert to make solar power accessible to more Americans, thereby cleaning our air, protecting our health, and hedging against volatile electricity prices.

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Shelter from the Storm

In the summer of 1993, residents of the American Midwest experienced the most costly flood in the history of the United States.1 By the end of that summer, the Mississippi River in St. Louis was 20 feet above flood stage, and levee breaks in Illinois led to the inundation of thousands of acres of land. The flood claimed 48 lives and caused nearly $20 billion in damage.

Report | PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center

Fracking Failures

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Frack Attack: Pennsylvania's parks and forests threatened by drilling

Pennsylvania is blessed with incredible public lands, from the famed hiking paths and scenic vistas of Loyalsock and Cook State Forests, to the pristine woods and walking trails of the Delaware Water Gap. Unfortunately, many of these places are under threat from fracking.

Report | PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

Wind power is on track to cut as much carbon pollution in Pennsylvania as 4 coal-fired power plants, or 3,689,000 cars produce in a year by 2030, according to a new analysis by the PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center.   If wind continues to grow at its current rate nationally, it will be able to supply 30% of our nation’s electricity needs by 2030. 

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